Richard Farrell Discusses Hair Loss Scalp Diseases

Richard Farrell’s professional expertise and ingenious artistic techniques have created an increasing demand for his advice, with appearances on talk shows, at trade shows, hair loss conventions, seminars and movie sets.

There is no known cause for alopecia areata and therefore no known cure
There are a variety of hair and scalp diseases; some are very common, while other more severe hair and scalp diseases are fortunately rare. Alopecia Areata is an autoimmune skin disease that causes the body’s immune system to attack the hair follicles, causing baldness in patches. It affects 1.7 percent of the population, including 4.7 million people in the United States. In cases where the disease progresses to the point where all scalp hair is lost, it is called Alopecia Totalis, and where hair loss advances to the entire body it is called Alopecia Universialis. There is no known cause for alopecia areata and therefore no known cure. The disease usually hits before age 20, and does not seem to favor one particular gender or culture. Hair loss with alopecia areata comes in stages, with hair returning and falling out in phases. Learn more about solving your hair loss: http://www.farrellhair.com/Men-Hair-Loss.aspx.

Japanese scientists have linked the overproduction of sebum to hair loss
Seborrheic Dermatitis, an advanced form of seborrhea, is a non-contagious skin disease that causes excessive oiliness of the skin, most commonly in the scalp, caused by overproduction of sebum, the substance produced by the body to lubricate the skin where hair follicles are present. Seborrhea is the form of the disease where oiliness only occurs without redness and scaling. The disease commonly occurs in infants, middle-aged people, and the elderly, and is commonly known in infants as cradle cap. The disease has no cure, yet in infants it usually disappears in time. With adults the condition may persist with varying degrees of severity. Flaking, scaling and redness often are symptoms of this disease. It is easily treated with topical solutions found in creams containing corticosteroids and shampoos containing pine tar, selenium sulfide or salicylic acid. Seborrhea and seborrheic dermatitis are both easily treated and controlled, and should be because left untreated they can contribute to hair loss. In fact, a group of Japanese scientists have linked the overproduction of sebum to hair loss. This is because the sebaceous glands in areas of the scalp where hair is thinning or bald are enlarged, and are thought to cause the clogging of pores and several other problems that promote hair loss. Learn more about solving your hair loss: http://www.farrellhair.com/Women-Hair-Loss.aspx.

Psoriasis is termed an immune-mediated disorder that affects different areas and functions of the body. It is non-contagious, and one of the areas of the body it can affect is the scalp. It usually appears as patches of raised red skin accompanied by burning and itching. Several contributing factors are thought to contribute to the outbreak of psoriasis, including emotional stress, certain infections, toxemia, the thinning of the intestinal walls and adverse reactions to certain drugs. At least half of people who have psoriasis have scalp psoriasis. Like seborrhea, scalp psoriasis left untreated can cause hair loss. Fortunately, it can also be treated with a variety of topical creams and shampoos containing tar and salicylic acid.

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